Trees Can Make You Happier

By Nancy Penrose

I love trees and have been helping people add them to their landscapes in the greater Seattle area for 24 years.

Indeed, trees play a crucial role in our lives through various means. Their primary function involves producing the oxygen essential for our breathing while absorbing carbon dioxide. However, some scientific studies suggest that trees offer additional significant advantages. Here are some intriguing findings derived from recent research on how trees contribute to human well-being.

Trees contribute to a reduction in stress and an increase in restoration. One of the most extensively studied benefits of exposure to nature is its ability to alleviate stress, anxiety, and have better deep thought, with much of this research centered around forests.

In a recent study, 585 young adults from Japan shared their mood experiences after a 15-minute walk, either in an urban environment or a forest. The study covered 52 different locations across the country, with approximately a dozen participants walking in each area. In all instances, those walking in a forest reported lower levels of anxiety, hostility, fatigue, confusion, and depressive symptoms, while exhibiting higher levels of vigor compared to those walking in urban settings. These effects were particularly pronounced for individuals who started the test with higher anxiety levels.

“The psychological benefits of walking through forests are very significant, and forest environments are expected to have very important roles in promoting mental health in the future,” stated the authors of the study.

Certainly, additional research indicates that engaging in “forest bathing,” a deliberate practice of spending time in the woods, can assist in coping with the pressures and challenges of urban life.

In a recent study conducted in Poland, participants devoted 15 minutes to observing either a winter urban forest or an urban landscape devoid of trees. The winter forest featured trees with straight trunks and no leaves, and there was no vegetation beneath the trees—essentially lacking any greenery. Conversely, the urban landscape was comprised of only buildings and roads. Prior to and following the observation period, participants completed questionnaires assessing their moods and emotions. Those who looked at the winter forest reported significantly improved moods, more positive emotions, increased vigor, and a heightened sense of personal restoration compared to those observing the urban scene lacking any trees.

It is possible that some of these benefits are related to the impact of forests on our brains. A study revealed that individuals living near trees exhibited better “amygdala integrity,” signifying a brain structure better equipped to handle stressors.

These findings, along with previous research reviews, underscore how even brief periods spent in a forest can offer respite from our hectic lifestyles. And that can include your own backyard with landscape trees.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Preparing Your Trees for Winter

By Nancy Penrose

Essential Tips for a Healthy Season
Winter can be a challenging time for trees. The cold in the air and on the ground make it difficult for trees to flourish, and trees in poor health may not survive the season at all.

With the right preparation, you can ensure that your arboreal companions make it through the cold months thriving and ready to bloom in the spring. At Big Trees Inc., we understand the importance of safeguarding your trees during winter and are here to provide you with essential tips for a healthy season.

1. Assess Tree Health
Before you embark on your winter tree care journey, it’s crucial to assess the current health of your trees. Inspect them for any signs of disease, pest infestations, or structural weaknesses. Identify dead or damaged branches that may pose a risk during winter storms.

2. Pruning and Trimming
Pruning and trimming your trees before winter can help reduce the risk of branch breakage under the weight of snow and ice. Focus on removing weak or overgrown branches, ensuring a balanced and sturdy tree structure. Be sure to use proper pruning techniques to avoid causing harm. Pruning before winter arrives helps ensure trees are ready for the colder season.

3. Mulching and Insulation
Mulch is your tree’s best friend in winter. A layer of organic mulch around the base of your trees helps insulate the soil, providing a buffer against extreme temperature fluctuations. For young or fragile trees, consider adding insulating materials or tree guards for added protection.

4. Pest and Disease Management
Winter is not a reprieve from tree pests and diseases. In fact, some thrive in cold weather. Be vigilant for signs of infestation or infection and take preventive measures. Consult with a professional arborist if you suspect a problem that requires treatment.

5. Wrapping and Shielding
Shielding your trees from harsh winter elements is crucial. Tree wraps and shelters can help protect your trees from frost and reduce the risk of sunscald. Secure these protective measures before the first frost arrives.

6. Monitoring and Winter Care Plan
Your commitment to tree care doesn’t end with winter preparation. Regularly check on your trees throughout the season. Remove heavy snow loads gently to prevent branch breakage. Adjust mulch and insulation as needed. Create a winter care plan to address any issues that arise promptly.

Are Your Trees Ready?
By following these essential tips for preparing your trees for winter, you’ll set the stage for a healthy and vibrant springtime comeback. Remember that Big Trees Inc. is here to assist you every step of the way. Don’t hesitate to reach out for professional guidance and support in ensuring your trees thrive all year round.

For more details and advice on tree care, contact Big Trees Inc. at 360-563-2700.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Essential Fall Tree Care Tips to Keep Your Trees Healthy and Vibrant

By Nancy Penrose

As the summer warmth begins to wane and the leaves start to turn brilliant shades of red, orange, and yellow, it’s a clear sign that fall is arriving. While fall might bring to mind images of pumpkin spice lattes and cozy sweaters, it’s also a crucial time to pay attention to the health of your trees. Proper fall tree care ensures that your trees remain vibrant and strong throughout the colder months and are ready to thrive when spring arrives once again. In this article, we’ll explore some essential fall tree care tips to help you keep your trees in excellent condition.

1. Raking and Leaf Removal
The sight of colorful leaves blanketing the ground is undoubtedly picturesque, but leaving too many leaves on the ground can have negative consequences for your trees and lawn. A thick layer of leaves can create a damp environment that promotes disease and inhibits healthy growth. Make sure to rake and remove fallen leaves regularly to prevent these issues.

2. Mulching
Applying a layer of mulch around the base of your trees is a great practice for fall tree care. Mulch helps retain moisture, regulates soil temperature, and suppresses weed growth. Apply a layer of mulch that is about 2-4 inches deep, making sure to leave a few inches of space around the tree trunk to prevent moisture buildup and potential rot.

3. Watering
While trees tend to require less water during the fall compared to the hot summer months, it’s still important to ensure they receive adequate hydration before the ground freezes. Trees need sufficient moisture to survive the winter and prepare for the spring growth season. Be sure to water your trees deeply but less frequently as the temperatures drop.

4. Pruning
Fall is an ideal time for pruning, as the trees are entering a period of dormancy. Pruning helps remove dead, damaged, or diseased branches, enhancing the overall health and appearance of your trees. Additionally, removing these branches can prevent them from falling and causing damage during winter storms. Always use proper pruning techniques and tools to avoid injuring the tree.

5. Inspect for Pests and Diseases
Perform a thorough inspection of your trees for any signs of pests or diseases. Fall is a crucial time to identify and address these issues before they have a chance to worsen over the winter. Look for abnormal growths, discoloration, or signs of infestation. If you’re unsure about a particular issue, consider consulting with an arborist for professional advice.

6. Protect Young Trees
Young and newly planted trees are particularly vulnerable to the harsh conditions of winter. Consider wrapping the trunks of young trees with burlap or tree wrap to prevent sunscald and frost cracks. This protection can also help keep rodents from gnawing on the bark during the colder months.

7. Fertilization
Fall is an optimal time to fertilize your trees, as they will absorb and store nutrients during the dormant season. A slow-release, balanced fertilizer can provide essential nutrients to support root growth and overall tree health. Consult with a professional or conduct a soil test to determine the specific nutritional needs of your trees.

For more details and advice on tree care, contact Big Trees Inc. at 360-563-2700.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

9 Great Fall Color Trees

By Nancy Penrose

Back in 2020 we published an article listing 10 great trees for fall colors. Now that we’re coming up on the end of summer, we thought we’d list out 9 more great trees to enhance the color of your landscape this fall.

1. Autumn Blaze Maple
The Autumn Blaze maple has brilliant bright red fall color. It is one of the first trees to go into fall color and one of the longest to hold the fall color. The Autumn Blaze maple is fast-growing and is 50 feet tall and 40 feet wide at maturity.

2. Autumn Applause Ash
The Autumn Applause Ash is pyramidal when young and gradually develops an upright oval shape. It has reliable fall colors of marron, purple, and deep red.

3. October Glory Maple
The October Glory makes a substantial shade tree for any yard.  With its rounded canopy, and deep green leaves it is a great way to beat the summer heat. The green summer leaf turns to stunning shades of red and orange in the fall for a stunning accent landscape piece.

4. Red Pointe Maple
With its natural pyramidal shape, the Red Pointe Maple is wonderful statement tree for even small yards.  Not only is this a versatile tree, but the fiery red fall color is also showstopping.

5. Red Sunset Maple
The Red Sunset maple is one of the most reliable trees for fall color, turning a brilliant orange red to deep red in early fall.

6. Katsura
The Katsura is an excellent specimen tree.  I can be found in both single and multi-trunk varieties.  Both have beautiful heart shaped leaves that are chartreuse in the spring and darken to a true green for summer. In the fall the leaves turn a lovely shade of yellow that is a nice contrast to most other deciduous trees that are shades of red and orange.

7. Persian Ironwood (Parrotia persica)
The Persian Ironwood has an upright rounded form with wide spreading branches. The bark of the trunk gives this tree winter interest by exfoliating to reveal a mosaic of green, white, and brown.  The dark green foliage develops into an ombre effect of greens, reds, oranges, and yellows.  

8. Stewartia
The Stewartia is an award-winning small deciduous tree with year-round interest. In early to mid-summer small cup shaped delicate flowers accent this specimen tree.  The dark green foliage of summer changes to dazzling hues of red, orange, and burgundy.  The exfoliating bark peels to stripes of grey, orange, and reddish brown. This slow growing pyramidal tree would be a great addition to any landscape.

9. Acer Palmatum
Native to Japan, Korea, and China the Acer palmatum includes numerous varieties of deciduous shrubs and trees.  These trees have a graceful elegance with intricately cut leaves that have many variations of summer and fall color. The Japanese maple can have rounded to broad rounded crowns and typically grow to be 10-25ft.  Some have an upright form while others have a weeping habit.  Regardless of which one you choose you are bound to love the delicate ease of the branching and leaf patters and will be dazzled by the extraordinary brilliance of the fall color.

With so many beautiful trees it really is hard to choose the best. If we missed your favorite, write to us at info@bigtreesupply.com and tell us about it!

In the end the really great thing about autumn is the pure variety of trees around us. It makes for quite a show that mother nature rolls out every year. At Big Trees Inc. we couldn’t think of any better show around.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Summer Tree Care Tips

By Nancy Penrose

Proper care of your trees during the summer months results in a healthy landscape for your yard. Summer is a great time to follow these five tree care tips.

1. Mulching:
Mulching trees is an important action because it cuts down on weeds, stabilizes soil temperatures, and helps conserve soil moisture. It’s best to mulch trees with 3-4 inches of shredded hardwood mulch. Be sure to keep the mulch 4-6 inches away from the trunk.  Placing mulch all the way up to the trunk can suffocate the roots and promotes disease and insect problems.

2. Irrigation:
During the hot summer months, watering trees may be needed, especially if your trees are young or newly planted. Newly planted trees need an average of one inch of water per caliper (trunk diameter), per day. IE: a 4” caliper tree needs 4 gallons of slow drip per day.

3. Fertilization:
Another important step in caring for trees in the summer is making sure they have adequate nutrition to support leaf growth, and resist pests and diseases, and that means fertilizer. Trees growing in urban or suburban areas often need more fertilization than trees in rural areas.

4. Pruning:
While most tree trimming should happen during the dormant season, there are some times when summer tree pruning is necessary. Any diseased, dead, or damaged branches should be pruned out for the health of the tree and for safety reasons. Also, spring flowering trees are best pruned in the early summer, after they finish blooming.

5. Tree pest inspections:
Examine trees for pest infestations regularly throughout the summer. While most insects are not harmful to trees, discovering any potential tree pest problems early gives you a better chance of controlling them.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

 

Planting a Tree Could Help You Live Longer

By Nancy Penrose

In the urban landscape, trees shade the sidewalks, absorb air pollution, lessen traffic noise, and also happen to be nice to look at. And of course trees take carbon dioxide in the air and convert it to oxygen, which we mammals kind of need for breathing.

But it also turns out that trees can help you live longer.

A recent research study conducted in Portland by the US Forest Service, found that in neighborhoods where a nonprofit was planting more trees, fewer people died.

Geoffrey Donovan, the Forest Service researcher who did the study, which was published in the December issue of the journal Environment International, stated  “Urban trees are an essential part of our public health infrastructure, and they should be treated as such.”

Green health care

For three decades, the Portland area nonprofit organization Friends of Trees planted nearly 50,000 oaks, dogwoods and other types of trees around the city. Between 1990 and 2019, Friends of Trees planted 49,246 street trees (and kept records of where they were planted and when). The research team looked at the number of trees planted in a given area, in the preceding 5, 10, or 15 years. They compared this information with death rates due to cardiovascular, respiratory, or non-accidental causes in that same area, using data from the Oregon Health Authority.

Using a mathematical model to remove factors such as race, income, age and education, the study found that for every 100 trees planted, there was approximately one fewer non-accidental death per year. So 50,000 trees planted equated to 500 fewer non-accidental deaths per year.

Yashar Vasef, executive director of Friends of Trees, which plants across six counties in Oregon and Washington, stated “Across the board, the benefits of trees are astounding. And they come at a lower cost than many other solutions.”

As the trees got older and taller, the mortality rates among nearby people went down, the study found.

Geoffrey Donovan from the US Forest Service stated “Bigger trees, bigger impact on mortality, which is what you would expect. Studies have found links between exposure to the natural environment and improved health in a wide range of different cities and countries. We certainly know that air pollution, stress, and sedentary behavior are bad for people no matter their race or socioeconomic status.”

The reverse, unfortunately, seems to be true, too. Mortality rates appear to go up in areas that lose tree cover.

In an earlier study, Donovan and his team saw an increase in deaths from cardiovascular and lower-respiratory-tract illnesses in areas from Minnesota to New York that lost trees from a pest called the emerald ash borer.

More trees, fewer deaths

Another recent study published in the British medical journal The Lancet suggested that a third of deaths from a 2015 heat wave in Europe could have been prevented with 30% more tree cover.

There are several reasons trees could boost health, including better air quality and increased levels of oxygen, less stress, and increased physical activity among residents of tree-lined neighborhoods. The link between more trees and lessening death rates held in both already heavy tree population neighborhoods, which tend to be more prosperous, and neighborhoods with fewer trees, which tend to be poorer.

The US Forest Service study stopped short of saying there was a direct cause-and-effect relationship between trees and death rates. But the statistics are pretty convincing and make for a safe bet.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Plant a Tree for Arbor Day

By Nancy Penrose

National Arbor Day is celebrated every year on the last Friday in April; this year on April 28th. It is a civic holiday in Nebraska. Some other states have selected their own dates for Arbor Day. The usual observance of Arbor Day is to plant a tree. On the first Arbor Day, April 10, 1872, approximately one million trees were planted.

Spring is one of the best times of the year to plant a tree.

In case you need more reasons to plant a tree, here is a list:

Plant Trees in Memory

Memorial trees planted in your yard can serve as a lasting, meaningful tribute in honor of someone special.

Plant Trees in Celebration

Plant Trees in Celebration of birthdays, anniversaries, new births, or any special occasion. By planting Trees in Celebration, you can honor your loved ones while caring about the environment and making your environment more green.

Live Longer

A recent study done by the US Forest Service found that in areas where a non-profit was planting thousands of oaks, dogwoods, and other trees in the Portland area, the rates of non-accidental deaths decreased by roughly 1 per year, per 100 trees planted. So plant a tree and you could live longer.

A More Beautiful and Healthier Environment

Trees take in carbon dioxide and give off oxygen that we need to breathe. Trees reduce the amount of storm water runoff, reducing erosion and pollution in our waterways and can reduce the effects of flooding. Trees shade the sidewalks, absorb air pollution, lessen traffic noise, and also happen to be nice to look at. Many species of wildlife depend on trees for habitat. Trees provide food, protection, and homes for many birds and mammals.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

How Long Does It Take a Tree to Recover From Transplanting

Transplanting a tree can be a necessary step for a many reasons, such as if the tree is outgrowing its current location, or if it’s simply in the way of construction or new landscaping plans. The process of transplanting a tree can be quite traumatic for the tree, and it’s important to give it the time and care it needs to recover.

How long does it take a tree to recover from transplanting? The answer to this question can depend on a variety of factors, such as the size and species of the tree, the time of year it’s transplanted, the care it receives after transplanting, and the overall health of the tree.  In general, smaller trees are able to recover more quickly from transplanting than larger trees. This is because they have smaller root systems and require less energy to establish themselves in their new location. However, even a small tree can take several months to fully recover from transplanting.

For larger trees, the recovery process can take much longer. It’s not uncommon for a large tree to take two to three years to fully recover from transplanting. During this time, it’s important to provide the tree with plenty of water and nutrients, and to avoid disturbing the soil around its roots.

The time of year that a tree is transplanted can also have an impact on its recovery time. In general, the best time to transplant a tree is in the fall, winter or early spring, when the tree is dormant and the weather is cooler. This allows the tree to focus its energy on establishing new roots and adapting to its new environment, rather than on growing new leaves or flowers.

The aftercare provided after transplanting is also critical to the tree’s recovery. Newly transplanted trees require regular watering, especially during the first year after transplanting. The soil should be kept moist but not waterlogged, as excessive moisture can lead to root rot. In addition to watering, the tree should be fertilized and pruned as needed to promote healthy growth and development.

The overall health of the tree can impact its ability to recover from transplanting. If a tree is already stressed or diseased before it’s transplanted, it may take longer to recover or may not recover at all. In these cases, it’s important to consult with a professional arborist to determine whether transplanting is the best option, or if other measures should be taken to improve the tree’s health.  A tree may show signs of recovery within a few weeks to a few months after transplanting. New growth may appear, and the tree may begin to produce leaves or flowers. However, full recovery can take much longer, especially for larger trees. It may take several years for the tree to fully establish itself in its new location and resume normal growth and development.

While recovery time can range from several months to a few years, it is important to be patient and provide the necessary care and attention to ensure the tree has the best chance of thriving in its new location. By taking these steps, you can help ensure the health and vitality of your newly transplanted tree for years to come.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or  http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

 

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Big Trees Solves Privacy Issue for Mobile Home Resident

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc, (https://bigtreesupply.com), a tree nursery and tree transplant company in the Seattle area, recently helped a mobile home resident with a request to block eyesores on a neighbor’s property.

Big Trees got the unusual request recently for screening trees needed to block out a neighbor. What was different in this scenario, is that the trees were to be planted in a mobile home park. Not only was there limited planting space, but shifting eyesores on the neighboring property.  After reviewing pictures of the site, it became clear that there was no planting space available where the screening needed to be to block out the neighbors never ending, shifting eye sores.

Big Trees suggested building 4 foot long, narrow planter boxes on wheels and then planting 6-7′ Emerald Green arborvitae. The final product worked perfectly! Not only do the four planters block out the neighbor’s yard, but they are easily moved around the property should that be necessary.

“This was a difficult problem to solve when we were faced with such limited planting areas,” said Nancy Penrose, owner of Big Trees.  “It’s not totally ideal as the trees at some point will out-grow the boxes, but the homeowner will get years out of this solution and it can just be recreated when necessary down the road.”

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or  http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

 

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

The Spacing Between Trees

By Nancy Penrose

Planting new trees is a great way to add beauty and value to your property, but it’s important to consider the proper spacing to ensure their health and growth. The distance between new trees when planting depends on several factors, including the species of tree, the intended use (e.g. for shade, ornamental, or privacy), and the size at maturity.

One of the most important factors to consider when planting new trees is their ultimate size and shape at maturity. If you are planting trees for shade or privacy, you’ll want to consider the mature height and spread of the tree species to ensure that they provide adequate coverage. On the other hand, if you are planting ornamental trees, you may want to consider their aesthetic appeal and choose species with attractive shapes and growth habits.

Another factor to consider is the availability of space. If you have a large property, you may have more flexibility in planting distances. However, if you have a smaller property, you may need to adjust your planting distances accordingly to accommodate the available space. In smaller landscapes, it’s important to choose smaller tree species or those with more compact growth habits to ensure that they do not become overcrowded.

In addition to the size and shape of the trees, it’s also important to consider the type of soil they will be growing in and the amount of sunlight or shade in the planting area. Some tree species have extensive root systems that need plenty of room to spread, while others have more shallow roots that can tolerate close planting. Soil type and moisture levels can also play a role in determining the appropriate planting distance.  Some tree species can handle shade or sun better than others as well.

When it comes to determining the proper planting distance, there are some general guidelines that can be followed. For most deciduous trees, it is recommended to plant them at least 10-15 feet apart. Coniferous trees, on the other hand, can often be planted closer together, as they typically have more compact growth habits. For large shade or ornamental trees, it is recommended to plant them at least 20-30 feet apart.  When planting evergreens for privacy, an additional consideration is the balance of “instant” privacy versus waiting for the trees to fill in overtime.  Budget plays a large role in this as well.

It’s important to keep in mind that these guidelines are just that – guidelines. Every tree species is unique, and the ideal planting distance will depend on a variety of factors, including the intended use of the trees, the size and shape of the tree at maturity, and the availability of space. If you’re unsure about the proper planting distance for a specific tree species, it may be helpful to consult with a local arborist or landscaper.

In conclusion, planting new trees is a great way to enhance your property, but it’s important to consider the proper spacing to ensure their health and growth. By taking into account the size and shape of the tree at maturity, the type of soil, and the availability of space, you can choose the appropriate planting distance and create a beautiful and sustainable landscape.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com